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How to Measure Social Media ROI for Business

January 6, 2010 Leave a comment

I have been blogging about social media, entrepreneurship, marketing and recruiting for approximately 1 month.  It is hard to measure (quantitatively) ROI for a social media campaign. What I find most useful in any social media medium is the use of ‘Status Updates’. Facebook, LinkedIN and Twitter all use ‘Status Update’ feeds to see what others are doing at any given point in time. I understand Facebook is very conversational while LinkedIN is used in business.

When building a community, I find linking myself to other recruiters can actually increase your book of business. How? I find most recruiters use ‘Status Update’ to update their existing ‘Connections’ on what assignments they are working on at this given time or what assignments they need the most help on. Using a split fee recruitment network, recruiters can have an idea on what other recruiters are working on and provide candidate assistance on those ‘tough to fill’ assignments.

Aaron Uhrmacher’s article, ‘How to Measure Social Media ROI for Business’ is a great article that tries to find some form of measurable metric to assess social media in a business context. He does a good job in identifying both quantitative and qualitative measurements in how we can measure the effectiveness of social media in a business context.

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Having a strong web/marketing presence can have hiring authorities calling you for your services rather than vice versa…

January 4, 2010 Leave a comment

Recently, I blogged about the use of YouTube videos in your firm’s marketing campaign while using Head 2 Head web presence as a core ‘case study’ example. I wrote on how effective this video can be used if marketed to the right audience. Sarah Welstead is a senior client relationship manager (aka senior recruiter) with Head 2 Head and has written this article on how effective the corporate video was in order to increase Head 2 Head’s brand awareness. According to Sarah, the results of this video are detailed below (as discussed in her blog):

  • Several potential clients requested meetings with us, because they wanted to hear more about our alternatives to contingency recruiting
  • Increased web traffic by about 20%
  • Increased average PPV (pages per visit) by about 33%
  • About 25 of our ‘brand champions’ reported referring us to a boss, friend or colleague (“I sent Bob at Acme Ltd. the link to the video and told him he should call you guys in the new year.”)

With the use of this innovative approach to recruiting, Sarah has concluded that their firm’s ROI has increased by over 500% just with the use of this video. Maybe traditional methods of obtaining job orders (cold calling hiring authorities)  is dead, and we (as recruiters) should try and embrace new ways of strategic marketing to promote our brand awareness. In essence, I believe with a strong marketing and web presence, hiring authorities should be able to find you (the recruiter) and your brand rather than recruiters searching out hiring authorities to find new clients and job orders.

Using Youtube videos as a successful marketing tool in promoting your firm

January 3, 2010 1 comment

Here is a fun corporate Youtube video on recruiting.  Sure, some people might find it offensive – however, marketing this video to the right audience (customers) can be very effective. I am sure significant measurable results can be obtained with the use of this video (results measured by number of job related inquiries, new job orders, # of click through to website etc..). Head 2 Head has approached the recruitment market through a  very unique billing system. Instead of a traditional 20% contingency rate, they have decided to bill the client based on the number of hours a recruiter works up to a maximum of 60 hours.

At times, I wonder if this is really feasible. Sometimes important search assignments last a lot longer than 60 hours. Most of the time,  its not the recruiter’s fault that a search assignment has dragged on for longer than the 60 hours they have promoted. In any case, I found Head 2 Head’s web presence and social media strategy quite effective in promoting their brand.

A company that is increasing sales through the use of a strong social media campaign – A study on 'Glynne Soaps'

January 2, 2010 Leave a comment

I have been following Chris Brogan’s blog for awhile.  He has posted an interesting article on how maintaining relationships will improve sales.  Now this is not a new point – in fact this is standard sales 101.  What’s interesting about this article is how he talks about the use of  social media (twitter, facebook, blogging) in order to maintain existing relationships.

We all know ‘soap’ is a commodity – however, when Chris needed soap, he was always reminded of ‘Glynne’ soaps.  Not Dove, Axe or any other brand. Glynne soaps used ‘modern’ marketing in a very strategic way.  They interacted with their customer base through conversations on twitter, product reviews placed on a facebook fan page and created a blog with a very interesting way of marketing their product. (You can see a picture of one of their marketing material  here).  All of this was done through a cost-effective social media campaign as they did not spend  money on expensive (and possibly ineffective) advertising campaigns.

Although Glynne soaps did a great job of using social media, Chris also points out a very important fact that has to be used in conjunction with a strong social media marketing campaign. The product (in our case  candidates) also has to be good!

A company that is increasing sales through the use of a strong social media campaign – A study on ‘Glynne Soaps’

January 2, 2010 1 comment

I have been following Chris Brogan’s blog for awhile.  He has posted an interesting article on how maintaining relationships will improve sales.  Now this is not a new point – in fact this is standard sales 101.  What’s interesting about this article is how he talks about the use of  social media (twitter, facebook, blogging) in order to maintain existing relationships.

We all know ‘soap’ is a commodity – however, when Chris needed soap, he was always reminded of ‘Glynne’ soaps.  Not Dove, Axe or any other brand. Glynne soaps used ‘modern’ marketing in a very strategic way.  They interacted with their customer base through conversations on twitter, product reviews placed on a facebook fan page and created a blog with a very interesting way of marketing their product. (You can see a picture of one of their marketing material  here).  All of this was done through a cost-effective social media campaign as they did not spend  money on expensive (and possibly ineffective) advertising campaigns.

Although Glynne soaps did a great job of using social media, Chris also points out a very important fact that has to be used in conjunction with a strong social media marketing campaign. The product (in our case  candidates) also has to be good!

Marketing Trends in 2010 – Mobile Marketing

December 31, 2009 2 comments

With the explosion of the internet within the last 10 years, the marketing field has drastically changed. Newspaper subscriptions have been rapidly declining with the emergence of news on the internet. I would believe within the last 3 – 5 years, we have been seeing a new trend emerging – Mobile Marketing. Smartphones are becoming so advanced that I once heard that the iPhone contains the power of a small 486 computer. With the new Android phone , iPhone and new Blackberries, there is definitely a trend towards marketing to business savvy individuals through their mobile phones. SMS Messaging has already taken off in Asia and some of the European countries  – however, it seems that North America is trying to catch up with the times.

I can see some new trends in mobile marketing occurring in 2010. Paul’s article ‘Five Can’t Miss Mobile Marketing Trends for 2010’ is an excellent article detailing how mobile marketing would expand and grow in 2010. He mentions one of the major trends that will occur in 2010 is:

“Adoption of Texting across generations – Texting is now engrained in our way of communicating, with the average American sending/receiving almost twice as many texts than phone calls”

What does this mean towards the recruitment (and manufacturing) industry? Setting up appointments and interviews through mobile phones will be more common. Quick messages to colleagues and senior management will be done not through e-mail, but through SMS text messages. Software and network systems can be developed to take advantage of SMS and texting mediums for the manufacturing floor. Imagine if there is a machinery breakdown at a plant, an operator will be able to push a button next to the machine which will send a SMS / text message immediately to the plant manager and/or supervisor’s cell phone and/or blackberry. Instant communication will increase productivity and efficicency on the plant/manufacturing floor.

Is this a new revolutionary wave in how we communicate? We will only find out as we embrace 2010 with new changes and new developments.

Categories: Sales Management

Importance of Recruiting – why is recruiting considered low on the ‘corporate power scale’

December 30, 2009 Leave a comment

I read this article last night and I found it quite interesting. As an engineering recruiter, my most busiest time of day is between the hours of 4:00pm – 6:00pm. This is when I receive the most phone calls / e-mails from my customers regarding feedback on candidate interviews. If recruiting was such an important function to the company/hiring individual, wouldn’t you expect that a customer will call you back first thing in the morning rather than the last minute of the day. Most of the time,  I will have to follow up with the hiring authority to obtain the feedback I want. I understand that hiring authorities are busy individuals. They would rather serve the company, generate revenue, increase production/efficiency, re-engineer their plant processes, visit key customers rather than return calls from recruiters.

Maybe we (as recruiters) have not demonstrated how important our services can affect the company’s bottom line (i.e. how can we show hiring authorities that the services we provide (a successful recruit) can actually generate/save the company millions of dollars).  The article than summarizes that maybe recruitment is industry specific.  Many sports teams and entertainment individuals view recruiting as a ‘mission critical’ resource. How many times on the news do we hear that a famous hockey player (or baseball player etc..) has signed ‘some kind of multi-million dollar contract’ with the competition. I’m sure the ‘sports agent (recruiter)’ got paid a nice hefty commission cheque for closing one of these deals!