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Recruitment Battlegrounds – Using social media to thrive in 2010

January 4, 2010 Leave a comment

2010 has arrived with promise of a more healthier 2009. I have talked about many changes that will be seen in this upcoming year.  We all know that the economy is going through a slow recovery, more companies are setting aside recruitment budgets for their hiring needs and social media / social recruitment is going to become more of a potent ‘player’ in the recruitment landscape. The use of twitter, facebook, YouTube and LinkedIN will become staples (if not already are)  and ‘must use’ tools in recruitment along with the ever popular job boards (which are slowly becoming ineffective) and the old fashioned ‘head hunting’ approach.

I came across Andy’s blog post today as he describes the upcoming year as a ‘recruitment battleground’. He mentions,

companies that have not yet embraced social recruiting, via the sites such as LinkedIn, Twitter and YouTube (not forgetting blogs), will need to take a long hard look at themselves, as these platforms will become the recruiting battlegrounds of 2010.”

I tend to agree with his stance as these trends have recently emerged within the last 3 –  5 years. Later, he mentions that with any battleground – there are casualties. Candidate and company expectations have grown considerably due to the use of this new medium. Communications (both internal and external) are becoming more rapid (almost instantaneous with the use of new smart phone technology) with  the integration of social media in the mobile phone space.  The recruitment landscape has definitely changed and we (as recruiters) must embrace and understand this new form of communication medium and avoid being a casualty of the recruitment wars.

Using Youtube videos as a successful marketing tool in promoting your firm

January 3, 2010 1 comment

Here is a fun corporate Youtube video on recruiting.  Sure, some people might find it offensive – however, marketing this video to the right audience (customers) can be very effective. I am sure significant measurable results can be obtained with the use of this video (results measured by number of job related inquiries, new job orders, # of click through to website etc..). Head 2 Head has approached the recruitment market through a  very unique billing system. Instead of a traditional 20% contingency rate, they have decided to bill the client based on the number of hours a recruiter works up to a maximum of 60 hours.

At times, I wonder if this is really feasible. Sometimes important search assignments last a lot longer than 60 hours. Most of the time,  its not the recruiter’s fault that a search assignment has dragged on for longer than the 60 hours they have promoted. In any case, I found Head 2 Head’s web presence and social media strategy quite effective in promoting their brand.

Corporate Buisness Recruiting using an NFL playbook

December 31, 2009 Leave a comment

Maybe companies should start recruiting in this way to find top talent. I have never heard of Wheeler Industries but this seems quite interesting.

Categories: Human Resources

Importance of Recruiting – why is recruiting considered low on the ‘corporate power scale’

December 30, 2009 Leave a comment

I read this article last night and I found it quite interesting. As an engineering recruiter, my most busiest time of day is between the hours of 4:00pm – 6:00pm. This is when I receive the most phone calls / e-mails from my customers regarding feedback on candidate interviews. If recruiting was such an important function to the company/hiring individual, wouldn’t you expect that a customer will call you back first thing in the morning rather than the last minute of the day. Most of the time,  I will have to follow up with the hiring authority to obtain the feedback I want. I understand that hiring authorities are busy individuals. They would rather serve the company, generate revenue, increase production/efficiency, re-engineer their plant processes, visit key customers rather than return calls from recruiters.

Maybe we (as recruiters) have not demonstrated how important our services can affect the company’s bottom line (i.e. how can we show hiring authorities that the services we provide (a successful recruit) can actually generate/save the company millions of dollars).  The article than summarizes that maybe recruitment is industry specific.  Many sports teams and entertainment individuals view recruiting as a ‘mission critical’ resource. How many times on the news do we hear that a famous hockey player (or baseball player etc..) has signed ‘some kind of multi-million dollar contract’ with the competition. I’m sure the ‘sports agent (recruiter)’ got paid a nice hefty commission cheque for closing one of these deals!

Importance of Recruiting – why is recruiting considered low on the 'corporate power scale'

December 30, 2009 Leave a comment

I read this article last night and I found it quite interesting. As an engineering recruiter, my most busiest time of day is between the hours of 4:00pm – 6:00pm. This is when I receive the most phone calls / e-mails from my customers regarding feedback on candidate interviews. If recruiting was such an important function to the company/hiring individual, wouldn’t you expect that a customer will call you back first thing in the morning rather than the last minute of the day. Most of the time,  I will have to follow up with the hiring authority to obtain the feedback I want. I understand that hiring authorities are busy individuals. They would rather serve the company, generate revenue, increase production/efficiency, re-engineer their plant processes, visit key customers rather than return calls from recruiters.

Maybe we (as recruiters) have not demonstrated how important our services can affect the company’s bottom line (i.e. how can we show hiring authorities that the services we provide (a successful recruit) can actually generate/save the company millions of dollars).  The article than summarizes that maybe recruitment is industry specific.  Many sports teams and entertainment individuals view recruiting as a ‘mission critical’ resource. How many times on the news do we hear that a famous hockey player (or baseball player etc..) has signed ‘some kind of multi-million dollar contract’ with the competition. I’m sure the ‘sports agent (recruiter)’ got paid a nice hefty commission cheque for closing one of these deals!

When Entrepreneurs become job seekers

December 30, 2009 Leave a comment

I have seen this quite a bit throughout my career as a recruiter. When the economy enters a recession, I see more resumes across my desk of candidates that are currently (or once) CEOs and Presidents that are trying to re-enter the job market to be ’employed’ by companies. This article relates that well. The harsh reality is that these ‘entrepreneurs’ are used to working for themselves and/or by themselves. Many entrepreneurs are considered to be called ‘Mavericks’ or ‘cowboys’ and will have difficulty reporting to a more senior / hierarchical power. Entrepreneurs receive many tax benefits and tax write-offs that they will also have to forego once they transition themselves to become an employee. You might say that the transition from CEO to employee not only involves a change of responsibility and job function but also, a change in complete lifestyle. I have seen some candidates make this transition quite smoothly while others, will have difficulty in adapting to this new way of life.

Changes in 2010 – Hiring a Researcher – an Important part in Recruiting

December 29, 2009 Leave a comment

I have been recruiting 7+ years without the use of a researcher. I have read other blogs stating the importance of research in the executive search business. Currently, I have been doing most of the ‘research’ and ‘recruiting’ legwork myself. This includes (but are not limited to): scanning resume databases (monster.ca, workopolis.com), updating our own internal database and using social networks (facebook, LinkedIN) to find qualified candidates. I have also been following trade magazines (Metalworking Canada , CIEN etc.) to gain a better understanding of my niche industry. With a researcher, I plan on branching out from my niche industry and start to look at different industries that I currently do not specialize in. Unfortunately, research takes the lion’s share of time when assisting existing and/or developing new clients.

2010 will be a different year. Campbell Morden Inc. is going through major transitions. I believe the exciting developments within the upcoming year will allow us to expand and ‘grow’ our firm. 2 research blogs I constantly follow are: Margism and Research Goddess. Both of these blogs state the importance of research and how research ‘fits’ in well  into a business context.

I think it will be a very interesting experiment and I eagerly look forward towards the growth and development of our firm in 2010.

Categories: Human Resources