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Archive for December, 2009

Corporate Buisness Recruiting using an NFL playbook

December 31, 2009 Leave a comment

Maybe companies should start recruiting in this way to find top talent. I have never heard of Wheeler Industries but this seems quite interesting.

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Categories: Human Resources

Marketing Trends in 2010 – Mobile Marketing

December 31, 2009 2 comments

With the explosion of the internet within the last 10 years, the marketing field has drastically changed. Newspaper subscriptions have been rapidly declining with the emergence of news on the internet. I would believe within the last 3 – 5 years, we have been seeing a new trend emerging – Mobile Marketing. Smartphones are becoming so advanced that I once heard that the iPhone contains the power of a small 486 computer. With the new Android phone , iPhone and new Blackberries, there is definitely a trend towards marketing to business savvy individuals through their mobile phones. SMS Messaging has already taken off in Asia and some of the European countries  – however, it seems that North America is trying to catch up with the times.

I can see some new trends in mobile marketing occurring in 2010. Paul’s article ‘Five Can’t Miss Mobile Marketing Trends for 2010’ is an excellent article detailing how mobile marketing would expand and grow in 2010. He mentions one of the major trends that will occur in 2010 is:

“Adoption of Texting across generations – Texting is now engrained in our way of communicating, with the average American sending/receiving almost twice as many texts than phone calls”

What does this mean towards the recruitment (and manufacturing) industry? Setting up appointments and interviews through mobile phones will be more common. Quick messages to colleagues and senior management will be done not through e-mail, but through SMS text messages. Software and network systems can be developed to take advantage of SMS and texting mediums for the manufacturing floor. Imagine if there is a machinery breakdown at a plant, an operator will be able to push a button next to the machine which will send a SMS / text message immediately to the plant manager and/or supervisor’s cell phone and/or blackberry. Instant communication will increase productivity and efficicency on the plant/manufacturing floor.

Is this a new revolutionary wave in how we communicate? We will only find out as we embrace 2010 with new changes and new developments.

Categories: Sales Management

Knowing how to communicate would be key to business success in 2010

December 30, 2009 Leave a comment

How do you communicate to your customers? Are they savvy on social media mediums such as Facebook, LinkedIN and Twitter. What type of voice do you prepare for your e-mail communication. How formal / informal should these e-mails be. There are definite signs that the economy will be turning around in 2010 and having a hard look at how we communicate with our customers is key. Communication is key in any business process. Understanding your customers and how they use social media forums to convey information is critical to business success.  I agree the amount that people use social media mediums depends on age, but I find a lot of the baby boomers are going towards twitter and facebook. Maybe us (as recruiters) should spend less time on facebook, twitter and LinkedIN as the baby boomer generation is only starting to embrace this revolution. A simple phone call to wish a person a ‘Happy New Year’ might be more appreciated to some individuals rather than a blanket e-mail or even worse (an e-mail card).

Internal communication is also very important. This article explains how to communicate with your internal employees and keep the top performers happy, content and productive when the economy bounces back.

Categories: 1

Importance of Recruiting – why is recruiting considered low on the 'corporate power scale'

December 30, 2009 Leave a comment

I read this article last night and I found it quite interesting. As an engineering recruiter, my most busiest time of day is between the hours of 4:00pm – 6:00pm. This is when I receive the most phone calls / e-mails from my customers regarding feedback on candidate interviews. If recruiting was such an important function to the company/hiring individual, wouldn’t you expect that a customer will call you back first thing in the morning rather than the last minute of the day. Most of the time,  I will have to follow up with the hiring authority to obtain the feedback I want. I understand that hiring authorities are busy individuals. They would rather serve the company, generate revenue, increase production/efficiency, re-engineer their plant processes, visit key customers rather than return calls from recruiters.

Maybe we (as recruiters) have not demonstrated how important our services can affect the company’s bottom line (i.e. how can we show hiring authorities that the services we provide (a successful recruit) can actually generate/save the company millions of dollars).  The article than summarizes that maybe recruitment is industry specific.  Many sports teams and entertainment individuals view recruiting as a ‘mission critical’ resource. How many times on the news do we hear that a famous hockey player (or baseball player etc..) has signed ‘some kind of multi-million dollar contract’ with the competition. I’m sure the ‘sports agent (recruiter)’ got paid a nice hefty commission cheque for closing one of these deals!

Importance of Recruiting – why is recruiting considered low on the ‘corporate power scale’

December 30, 2009 Leave a comment

I read this article last night and I found it quite interesting. As an engineering recruiter, my most busiest time of day is between the hours of 4:00pm – 6:00pm. This is when I receive the most phone calls / e-mails from my customers regarding feedback on candidate interviews. If recruiting was such an important function to the company/hiring individual, wouldn’t you expect that a customer will call you back first thing in the morning rather than the last minute of the day. Most of the time,  I will have to follow up with the hiring authority to obtain the feedback I want. I understand that hiring authorities are busy individuals. They would rather serve the company, generate revenue, increase production/efficiency, re-engineer their plant processes, visit key customers rather than return calls from recruiters.

Maybe we (as recruiters) have not demonstrated how important our services can affect the company’s bottom line (i.e. how can we show hiring authorities that the services we provide (a successful recruit) can actually generate/save the company millions of dollars).  The article than summarizes that maybe recruitment is industry specific.  Many sports teams and entertainment individuals view recruiting as a ‘mission critical’ resource. How many times on the news do we hear that a famous hockey player (or baseball player etc..) has signed ‘some kind of multi-million dollar contract’ with the competition. I’m sure the ‘sports agent (recruiter)’ got paid a nice hefty commission cheque for closing one of these deals!

When Entrepreneurs become job seekers

December 30, 2009 Leave a comment

I have seen this quite a bit throughout my career as a recruiter. When the economy enters a recession, I see more resumes across my desk of candidates that are currently (or once) CEOs and Presidents that are trying to re-enter the job market to be ’employed’ by companies. This article relates that well. The harsh reality is that these ‘entrepreneurs’ are used to working for themselves and/or by themselves. Many entrepreneurs are considered to be called ‘Mavericks’ or ‘cowboys’ and will have difficulty reporting to a more senior / hierarchical power. Entrepreneurs receive many tax benefits and tax write-offs that they will also have to forego once they transition themselves to become an employee. You might say that the transition from CEO to employee not only involves a change of responsibility and job function but also, a change in complete lifestyle. I have seen some candidates make this transition quite smoothly while others, will have difficulty in adapting to this new way of life.

Changes in 2010 – Hiring a Researcher – an Important part in Recruiting

December 29, 2009 Leave a comment

I have been recruiting 7+ years without the use of a researcher. I have read other blogs stating the importance of research in the executive search business. Currently, I have been doing most of the ‘research’ and ‘recruiting’ legwork myself. This includes (but are not limited to): scanning resume databases (monster.ca, workopolis.com), updating our own internal database and using social networks (facebook, LinkedIN) to find qualified candidates. I have also been following trade magazines (Metalworking Canada , CIEN etc.) to gain a better understanding of my niche industry. With a researcher, I plan on branching out from my niche industry and start to look at different industries that I currently do not specialize in. Unfortunately, research takes the lion’s share of time when assisting existing and/or developing new clients.

2010 will be a different year. Campbell Morden Inc. is going through major transitions. I believe the exciting developments within the upcoming year will allow us to expand and ‘grow’ our firm. 2 research blogs I constantly follow are: Margism and Research Goddess. Both of these blogs state the importance of research and how research ‘fits’ in well  into a business context.

I think it will be a very interesting experiment and I eagerly look forward towards the growth and development of our firm in 2010.

Categories: Human Resources